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the other people here. let's talk about president kennedy. today is saying ira stoll makes the case that jfk was a conservative. i do argue in this book that by the standards of his time in our own, john kennedy was a conservative to cut taxes and tariffs and the strain domestic spending and wanted to reform welfare and built up the military and conceded to the cold war pressures against what he considered the godless soviet union. but i'm not just being modest when i say that i think the strongest arguments in this book are when the book begins with congressional candidate on july july 19 only six in which he spoke of the right of the individual against the state and christian morality. he said that america's basic religious ideas were being challenged at home and in the cynical philosophy of many of our intellectuals and abroad in the doctrine of collectivism. and i mentioned kennedy's 1950 speech at notre dame in which he won the ever expanding power of the federal government and the absorption of many of the functions that faith and cities once considered the responsibilities of their ow
the troops there kennedy was on the phony, are the troops? they're on the way. so you have that. and in an effort to kind of bring reality some fantasy together, i construct a meeting in which most of the participants speak the words they actually spoke at one time. i just put it somewhere else. there's a man, an unsung hero of vietnam, civil serviceman named paul, head of the vietnam working group, and in a meeting with the other big shots had the temerity from the back to say, maybe we shouldn't be there? and a couple weeks later they got rid of him. now, kennedy was one guy what wanted as much information as possible. so i construction a meeting where kennedy brings there is guy to sit down and fight it out, and at the end of it, this is what kennedy says. here's the point, he says. said it to you, mike, mike mansfield, knowledgeable man about vietnam. i said it to kenny o'donnell and charlie bartlett, we don't have a prayer of staying in vietnam. those people hate us. they're going to throw our asss out of there at am any point but i can't give up the territory to the viet c
recalls the last 100 days of president john f. kennedy's life, which began on the day his two-day old son, patrick died on august 9, 1963. the author reports that during the final months of kennedy's life he gained a greater understanding of the civil rights movement, sought a better relationship with the soviet union, and presented his doubts on the u.s. involvement in the non. this is about one hour. >> thank you very much. it's a pleasure to be back at politics and prose, one of my favorite bookstores anywhere, not just in washington, d.c. i'd like to ask you, who here has seen the portrait of kennedy in the national portrait gallery in the halls of kennedy? that's great. you know it's quite unlike any of the other portraits. it was painted by the estranged wife of -- the story behind how the portrait happened to be there i think is a kind of interesting one and, in fact, i opened my book with it. i'd like to share it with you just briefly. she was supposed to paint one portrait for the truman library in independence, missouri, and she was chosen because everybody knew that john f. ken
.com/booktv. >> november 22, 2013, the 50th anniversary of the assassination of president john f. kennedy. and several books that have been published to mark the event. for this month's booktv bookclub, we want to know what book you are reading. join other readers to discuss the books published this year in good booktv.org and click on the club to enter the chat room. when they are, check out the resources that we have posted, including book reviews and videos from the booktv archives and you can log in as a guest or through your facebook or twitter account. and then join us on saturday, november 30, at 11:00 a.m. eastern for a live chat to discuss books on the 35th president and contact us via facebook to sign up for the live chat. >> this fall is booktv's 15th anniversary and this weekend we look back at 2009. the national book award for nonfiction that your went to tj stiles for his biography of cornelius vanderbilt and the 2009 high outcries or the history of the great depression and the forgotten man. the pulitzer prize for a biography went to johnny jim and his account of the presidential tenure
today, at this very hour president kennedy and mrs. kennedy just touched down at love field. they were greet bid a friendly crowd. as their motorcade reached dountown dallas, things changed in an instant. it was a tragedy that shook america to its core as america lost its innocence. >> the hospital has been asked to stand by for a severe gunshot wound, a shooting in the motorcade in the downtown area. >> a flash from dallas. two priests who were with president kennedy say he is dead. >> president john f. kennedy died at approximately 1:00 central standard time today here in dallas. he died of a gunshot wound in the brain. i have no other details regarding the assassination of the president. >> from dallas, texas, the flash, apparently official, president kennedy died at 1:00 p.m. central standard time, 2:00 eastern standard time, some 38 minutes ago. >> and good day. i'm andrea mitchell in washington. at this hour, all eyes are on dallas where today that city remembers the faithful day with a solemn ceremony. we'll bring all that to you live. fifty years ago today president and mrs. ke
. kennedy 50 years later. >> president kennedy has been assassinated. it's official now. the president is dead. >> a half century later the nation pauses to remember one of its darkest hours. the death of a beloved president. it is the first official ceremony to mark the event in dallas. the memorial set to coincide with the time and day that kennedy's motorcade traveled through the city of dallas 50 years ago. this is arlington national ceremony. it is the most popular cite visited there. bill and hillary clinton joining president obama on friday, laying a wreath there. we want to take you now to dallas. heidi zhou castro joins us from dealey plaza to tell us about the events scheduled there, and it is a huge event there as thousands are expected to attend. >> that's right. dell. as the ceremony is about to start, so is the sleet. a very cold and windy day for dallas. nothing like the bright sun shown over dallas in 1963, but as you can see this is not keeping the crowd at home. 14,000 wanted to be here today, they applied to be here, and only 5,000 were picked in a lottery, randomly
, because i am an ocd won't and a former strategist, you'll find them here john kennedy second acceptance speech in the goldwater kennedy debate and his advisers want him to debate them if they have i tell the country that and what is my explanation for not leaving? because he said that i know it benefits the calendar. but the idea is that kennedy wins and just have a little bit more fun, a rewrite the lyrics of some rock songs and some say it is my book. i'm not going to give away all of this stuff, but the most consequential question is what happens with vietnam and civil rights. and what about the 22nd approach is? they can be a huge debate. the conservatives will tell you that he ran as a hawk and he often said that we are not going to leave vietnam than we would have the same advisers as lyndon johnson. .. the army couldn't get the troops there kennedy was on the phony, are the troops? they're on the way. so you have that. and in an effort to kind of bring reality some fantasy together, i construct a meeting in which most of the participants speak the words they actually spoke at one
to the class and she said students i have terrible news. president kennedy has been shot but he is still alive. take out your rosaries and let's pray for the president. back in those days rosaries were standard operating equipment in the catholic classroom so we all took out our rosaries. we were saying and holding each beat for dear life in maybe 20 minutes later or so she had to go out in the hall and she came back and she was crying. we knew. it was over. >> host: where was the school? >> guest: norfolk virginia saint pius the x. they will kill me if i don't mention it. i remember everything about it. i remember, and everybody was crying. i went to my locker's a good friend of mine was cleaning out his locker for the weekend because the next week is thanksgiving. the odd thing is that i guess he would have to be in catholic school at the time to understand that i remember saying to my friend, he is the only catholic president he didn't live to finish out his term. that's the way we looked at it back then. i was seven when kennedy ran for president and i was so excited. it was the eighth sac
about kennedy if he had had a second term? ... i think kennedy would have struggled too in a second term. this is all sheer speculation but kennedy of course comes down to us now as it's an open book. you can write anything onto it you want because he was killed at the age of six, only 1000 days in the white house. he had a sense of the ironic. he would have seen the irony in the fact that his early death gave him this enduring hold on the public and it is fascinating to me because when kennedy was assassinated a popular president elected to a second term, 50 years after his death hardly anyone remembered who he was but here we are a couple weeks away from kennedy's 50th anniversary and i'm telling you i am inundated with requests from poland, from russia, from switzerland, from sweden, from denmark, american journalists and my dear departed mother used to say it's a case of crying with a loaf under either arm. [laughter] but i'm getting tired of it. i vowed after november 21, somebody said you write a book to get a subject so november 22 i don't want to talk about kennedy anymore. peopl
. kennedy, who is lee harvey oswald, why is jackie wearing a suit with blood. on and on for four days. everybody kind of tuned in. there's a line by bob dylan said people don't live or die people just net. most people live in the-lined lives when kennedy was killed, they weren't floating any more it was like realtime adrenaline for the whole country. >> schieffer: you know, those of us who were here and covered this story, i think a part that is not really understood today is that beyond this tragedy that we saw unfolding on television, we'd never seen anything like this before. hanging overall this it was like we all felt on 9/11 we didn't know what it meant. we didn't know if this was the beginning of world war iii, a year away from the human missile crisis. it was just this profound, i can't understand this. why is this happening. and i think in a sense that america was never quite the same of a it was after that day. your book focuses on kennedy's last 100 days, why do you think that period was so important? >> because finally in that period he was addressing the two great threa
f. kennedy would continue his term and go into a second term perhaps. for better or worse we would be living his legacy instead of marking his murder half a century later. ♪ ♪ >>> tapping this morning john f. kennedy's grave. there was a wreath laid not far from where brothers ted and bobby lie. she's 85 years old, the last surviving sibling. had he lived this long he would be 9 6 years old. remembrances across the city today. in ireland, as well. in dilly plaza a outpouring of affection for a president so many texans viewed with suspicion in 1963 but so many others flocked to see. as the governor's wife told the president, well, mr. president, you can't say dallas doesn't love you. moments later, shots rang out. this is how millions of americans 50 years ago to the day experienced the moments that followed. >> president kennedy has been shot in dallas, texas. >> in downtown dallas, president kennedy was shot today just as his motorcade left downtown dallas. mrs. kennedy jumped up and grabbed mr. kennedy and cried oh, no, the motorcade sped on. >> no word at all -- official wor
that focuses on the numerous books on president john f. kennedy and the 50th anniversary of his assassination. in this block you'll hear from martin sandler, editor of the letters of john f. kennedy who presents a collection of the 35th president's correspondences. then ira stoll examines kennedy's policy record and deems him a conservative in, "jfk conservative." this is followed by a panel of firsthand accounts of the jfk assassination with dr. alan childs and howard willens, the only living member of the supervisory staff of the warren commission from this year's texas book festival. and later, jeff greenfield, author of "if kennedy lived, imagine how a second administration would have governed." and we conclude with historian robert dallek, author of "camelot's court." it all happens next on booktv. >> now, historian martin sandler presents a collection of john f. kennedy's personal correspondences. the letters range from notes sent to his parents from boarding school to secret missives to soviet premier new kieta khrushchev during the cold war. this event from the hyannis museum in massa
what robert kennedy said was we did everything we had to. we were going for broke. we got the tax return office the steel company executives, got their expense accounts, we wire-tapped their home. and they -- kennedy heard a report on huntley-brink lee, thought it was too kind. he told the fcc i want you to do something about that. here it is. robert kennedy's quote. we're going for broke, their expense accounts, where they'd been, i told the fbi to interview them, march into their offices-subpoena their company records. we can't lose this. later jack kennedy said about clark clifford's role, can't you see clifford outrunning the possible course office action the government can take? you know what you're doing when you screw around with the power of the president? i don't think u.s. steel or any other companies want internal rev enough agents checking expense accounts. want government to go back to he tell bills to fine out who was with you? these are real quotes. now, if the kens were prepared to do this to stop a steel price hike, what they do to keep the presidency in their han
now. erin, than. the presidential medal of freedom and president john f kennedy who created the award 50 years ago, they include president clinton and the original honorees and poll raid inventor. that ceremony was held by president johnson two weeks after the killing of the president in dallas. tonight, 50 years later, president obama paid tribute to jfk and the vision he had for this country. >> this is a legacy of a man who could have retreated to a life of luxury and ease, but who chose to live a life in the arena sailing sometimes against the wind, sometimes with it, and that's why 50 years later, john f. kennedy stands for prosperity as he did in life, young and bold and daring, and he stays with us in our imagination, not because he left us too soon but because he embodied the character of the people he led, resilie resilient, rest lute, fearless and fun loving, defiant in possible of all odds and to make the world a new one, not settling for what is but later what might be. >> the clintons and obamas laid a wreath at the grave. it's the first time since the tell all put a stra
exhibit on the legacy of president kennedy. they're gentle reminder of president kennedy's 36 days in the white house. why do so many people have questions about what happened during those six seconds in dallas? you're about to see why. >>> i first met -- >> ruth payne invited a russian immigrant, marina oswald to live with her while her husband looked for a job. lee harvey oswald. >> basically he was saying he didn't like the u.s., and they went to the soviet union thinking it would be better, but tfrtn't better. >> ruth thinks oswald was the lone assassin. >> it's not that i had known the assassin, but that we lost a really wonderful president. and all the things that he might have been able to do. >> my fellow americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. >> he gave people hope, optimism. >> a presidential historian's latest book called "camelot court." it's a shining moment in history. the idea that he was something special. >> november 22, 1963, the day give begins with an excited welcome for president kennedy outside his ft. worth
and his new book "the kennedy half-century." the university of virginia politics professor explores the legacy of the kennedy administration knowing how each successive president has used his image to further his own agenda. the program is about an hour. >> host: larry "the kennedy half-century" is a marvelous achievement. where were you on november 22, 1963? >> guest: i was 11 years old. i was in catholic elementary school, sixth grade. i had a wonderful sister a nun sister roberta miriam and sometime in the early afternoon a knock at the door came and that was rare. back in those days you were not interrupted in class. she went to the door and i heard her gasp. she placed her hand up against her chest. she came back to the class and she said students i have terrible news. president kennedy has been shot but he is still alive. take out your rosaries and let's pray for the president. back in those days rosaries were standard operating equipment and the catholic classroom so we all took out our rosaries and we were holding each bead for dear life. maybe 20 minutes later or so she had
? tonight i talk to members of the kennedy family, the doctor that treated jfk and lee harvey oswald and the only survivor there when he was arrested and shot by jack ruby. the truth about jfk, life and death, his presidency and what might have been. this is jfk 50 years later, a "piers morgan live" special. >>> good evening. no american who was alive on that dark day will ever forget, they can still tell you precisely where they were when they heard the almost incomprehensible news the president of the united states john f. kennedy had been assassinated. for many, that news came from walter cronkite on cbs news. >> from dallas, texas, the flash apparently official, president kennedy died at 1:00 p.m. central standard time. 2:00 eastern standard time. some 38 minutes ago. >> tonight in the extraordinary hour of eyewitness accounts, conspiracy theories and the stories you've never heard before. we go to john king who takes a look back at the awful day. >> november 22nd, 1963 was day two of a five-city texas campaign swing. it was 11:37 a.m. local time, air force one, wheels down at lo
as jacqueline kennedy and what she did to the country. >> she was 31 years old. it's extraordinary the sense of history that she brought to the white house and the way that she so style lish shi shifted from the sleepy eisenhower years to really it's the first president who was born in the 20th century. so she brought a sense of modernity to the white house and everything this young family did was news. helen thomas who covered the white house then when caroline kennedy's hamster went missing 0 died, you know, that was huge news. the corrupt was eager for all of that. of course, the press as an institution, we weren't uncovering the dirt then. we didn't really do anythingo sully the wonderful image that this young family put forward. >> a whole different journalistic ethic, if you will. kathy horn, you have written an amazing article in the "new york times"ing about jacquelinet weay dallas. a chanel suit. tell our viewers about the suit, about what happened to it because it's a powerful indication of that moment. >> well, good afternoon, wolf. she will -- it was a chanel suit. she wore it si
and the emotion that unites us. >> jacqueline kennedy's 1000 days as first lady was defined by images, young mother, advocate for the arts, fashion icon. footage of the assassination of president kennedy and his funeral cemented her in the public consciousness. welcome to the c-span series, first ladies, influence and image. we have two guests at the table, to tell you more about her story. he has a special focus on the cold war era and the kennedy administration. robert parry is a political scientist and as part of the modern first ladies series, he has written the jacqueline kennedy biography. before we get into more details about her white house years, i want to talk about the images of that assassination. anyone who was alive at that time has those images in their mind. this is a collective consciousness. she was just 34 years old. >> just 34 years old. we know so much about this story. he was shot and into her arms, for five minutes they were there and she felt that they left the hospital to go back to washington, but they had to do something to make sure that he had the historical repu
series features jacqueline kennedy. a veterans day celebration -- ceremony at the world war ii memorial. ♪ >> i think every first lady should do something in this tradition to help the thing that she cares about. i just think that everything in the white house should be the best. the entertainment that is given here. >> children are the same the world over and so is our feeling for children. i think it is good in the world, there is quite enough to divide people, so we should cherish the language and the emotion that unites us. >> jacqueline kennedy's 1000 days as first lady was defined by images, young mother, advocate for the arts, fashion icon. footage of the assassination of president kennedy and his funeral cemented her in the public consciousness. welcome to the c-span series, first ladies, influence and image. we have two guests at the table, to tell you more about her story. he has a special focus on the cold war era and the kennedy administration. robert parry is a political scientist and as part of the modern first ladies series, he has written the jacqueline kennedy biograp
of "sunday morning.". john fitzgerald kennedy was assassinated 50 years ago this coming friday. a traumatic event that haunts our nation still. all this morning we'll be remembering the 35th president of the united states, the shooting in dallas that cut him down in the prime of life. >> ask not what your country can do for you, ask you -- ask what you can do for your country. (cheers and applause) >> osgood: young and vigorous, john f. kennedy captured the imagination of millions of americans with his vision of a new frontier. >> we choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things not because they are easy but because they are hard. >> it appears as though something has happened in the motorcade group. >> osgood: after dallas, the horror of his end, the dashed hopes of what might have been. throughout the morning we'll be remembering key moments of that have friday afternoon and the three days that followed and we'll be taking the measure of a kennedy legacy. the john f. kennedy who loom sod large in our national memory very much a mixture of fact and legend. rita braver wil
. kennedy hyannis museum. we're very happy to have you here this evening, and we're happy to have c-span with us as well for the author, martin >> of the us jfk intelsat lookid museum i am happy to haveyou all fou here with us we are cole o looking forward to run thiss, iu program and we thank you again i want to give you a couple of reminders to please turn yourself phones c-s off since he are being maybe on recorded by industry indices van will broadcast within th the next couple of weeks may be on the weekend so keep an eye out for that.have a the microphones the you seerom e are not for a distribution hear , roughout the museum so if iimd you have a question don't you cn expect to be heard spee buty hankeed good question. t >> the author is very shy. no [laughter] they should be a lively discussion and we look forward to that. thank you for coming welco saramaccan though women and no hotel room keys strode up here. [laughter] >> i would extend my welcomesaim to those that were justs offered and martin sandler than is your. his a welcome.g >> a he has written and published thn mo
>>> good evening. this is "piers morgan live" looking at the grave site of john f kennedy at arlington national cemetery. two days after the assassination jackie requested the flame as a permanent memorial. 50 years later, america and the world are remembering the 35th president in dallas, the city where jfk died a moment of silence at 12:30 local time, the exact moment the shots rang out in dealey plaza. >> ladies and gentlemen, would you join me in a moment of silence in honor of the life of john fitzgerald kennedy? >> president kennedy was cut down before he could finish his first term and his story is different. he's overwhelmingly popular with americans today, much more so than when he was alive. jfk is the most popular president of the last half sentry with a 90% approval rating. >>> i want to begin tonight with a man who stood by the kennedys on that tragic day 50 years ago. client hill is a secret service agent who jumped on the back of the presidential limo and haunted for decades. his new book is "five days in november" and client hill joins me now. thank you so
terrible news. president kennedy has been shot but he's stil he is still alive. take out your rosaries and we will pray. rosaries were standard operating equipment so we took out our rosaries and we were holding each bead for dear life and i don't know maybe 20 minutes later or so she had to go out and thinthe hallway and came bad she didn't have to tell us anything. she was crying and we knew. >> do you remember that weekend at all? >> guest: i remember everything about it. we were all upset. and i went to my walkers. a good friend of mine because the next week was thanksgiving and the odd thing you have to be at catholic school at the time to understand but i remember seeing to my friend he was the only catholic elected president and he didn't live to finish out his term and that's the way that we looked at it back then. i was seven when he ran for president and i was so excited. it was the eighth sacramento bee for john f. kennedy and i passed out literature in my neighborhood. i remembered a woman slamming the door and saying i don't support a papist. i didn't know what that was th
if anyone has conjecture or not. had kennedy not been killed that day, how do you think history would've been changed, particularly the civil rights movement and what are the changes in history that you think that would have a situational had kennedy full-term, a full two-term? >> i will try to answer that because of speculation, but i don't think that mr. kennedy, even though he started this, i don't think you would've had the power to get the legislation through to do that. and how that might have affected the nation would've had another 10 years without that civil rights legislation and i'm not sure what kind of chaos could have happened. >> i think that's a very good answer. there have been many books written by story ends to address that issue. and one that i have recently been reading as well on emphasizing the extent of the president and his brother for whom i worked in the justice department were extremely unhappy with the way in which the military officials demanded that they take a more militant staff with respect to the soviet union and the steps that they wanted to take an
the assassination of john f. kennedy. since that tragedy, since that inexplicable loss brought about changes, changes in the way we govern, changes in the party, changes in how we cover the american presidency. we'll get to that this morning, we'll try with a remarkable mix of panelists, people who have worked with president kennedy, people who are eyewitnesses to history. people who covered president kennedy, have studied president kennedy, are related to president kennedy. we're excited about all that we have planned for today and we begin today in dallas, 50 years ago, this friday. john fitzgerald kennedy, the president of the united states, was on a political visit to texas to mend fences in an intrapart feud among state democrats. first lady jacquelineccompanyin first of many trips as her president prepared to seek a second term. it was the middle of the day when the motorcade reached daley plaza in downtown dallas. >> it is approaching 12:30 p.m. dallas time. the crowds and the tall business district are overfilling the sidewalks. some throw streamers and torn paper in a miniature tick
>>> tomorrow night cnn special "the assassination of president kennedy" how our view of that terrible day has changed 50 years later. friday night i'll be back with members of the kennedy family and the secret service agent who risked his life in a doomed attempt to save the president. that's all for us tonight. "ac 360 later" starts right now. >>> good evening, everyone. president john f. kennedy created the award 50 years ago. they include former president clinton, oprah winfrey, and ernie banks and polaroid inventor, edward land. that happened two weeks after the president killing in dallas. >> this is a legacy of a man who could have retreated to a life of luxury and ease. but he chose to live life in the arena. sailing sometimes against the wind. sometimes with it. and that's why 50 years later, john f. kennedy stands for prosperity as he did in life. young, bold, and daring. and he stays with us in our imagination. not because he left us too soon. but because he embodied the character of the people he led. resilient. resolute. fearless and fun-loving. defiant in
is his name. behind the car is mrs. kennedy and members of the immediate family. in the other cars as well. and the others the cortÈge has halted not ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ the wind is rustling the flag that drapes the casket. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [patriotic music] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [patriotic music] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> as the years go by, there is a significant tradition on this splendid street. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> an olive branch in one hand and the arms of war and another. during i think what was the truman administration, he ordered it returned for the olive branch and that's the way it is today. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> marching in front of the military cortÈge. special armed forces, paratroops come actually. ♪ ♪. back onto pennsylvania avenue, the white house, one block away. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪
50th anniversary of the tragic assassination of president john f. kennedy. but tonight, we will celebrate his true legacy. he was a key proponent of economic growth and an inspiration for supply-side economics for decades to come. just check it out. listen to this. >> it is a paradoxical truth that tax rates are too high today and tax revenues are too low. and the soundest way to raise the revenues in the long run is to cut the rates now. >> you can't tell me he wasn't a supply-cider. we'll have all these stories and more. "the kudlow report" begins right now. first up tonight, a lot of news on obama care today. let's get to dominic chu for all the details. >> good evening, larry. let's start with the doctors because there is new increasing concern about how much they will be paid under obama care. now, it's very difficult to get exact figures on what doctors charge. but through interviews with doctors, a news service came up with these useful estimates. a doctor might be paid $100 for an office visit of a complex nature. medicare pays $90 of that. but for the same thing, t
.c., and this is a special photo exhibit on the legacy of president kennedy. there are gentle reminders of kennedy's 1,036 days in the white house but they also capture a moment of murder. 50 years later, why do so many have questions about what happened during those six seconds in dallas? you're about to see why. >> i first met them at a party in dallas in 1963. >> ruth payne invited the russian immigrant marina ozwald to live with her while her husband lee harveys a wald looked for a job. >> i called the school book depository to see if there were any openings. >> oswald got that job. >> he was basically saying he didn't like the u.s., went to the soviet union thinking it would be better, but it wasn't better. >> she believes oswald was a lone assassin. >> for me, the thing about the assassination is not that i had known the assassin, but that we lost a really wonderful president, and all the things that he might have been able to do. >> my fellow americans, ask not what your country can do for you. ask what you can do for your country. >> he gave people hope, optimism. >> presidential historian rob
>> rose: welcome to the program. tonight, 50 years after the assassination of president kennedy in dallas we remember and assess his legacy with robert dallek, jeff greenfield, richard reeves, michael beschloss, and jill abramson. >> among the many thing he is did politically-- and i think he was a relatively good president-- the fact of the matter is, the most important thing about him-- partly because of his health-- is that he did not wait his turn. he destroyed the system that would not have made him president. he didn't wait his turn and now in america no one does. >> put aside all the myth, put it all aside, this was somebody who excited and aroused the country to a kind of civic interest that i think would not have happened had he not been president. >> rose: we conclude with clint hill, the secret service agent who climbed aboard the presidential limousine as it sped to parkland hospital with the dying president. >> i still have a sense that that we had a responsibility to do that day st. we failed in that responsibility. the way i was brought up was that if you have a j
25 marks the 50th anniversary of president kennedy's state funeral. we will now bring you nbc's coverage, including the procession from the u.s. capitol to the white house. the mass at saint matthews cathedral, and the burial service at arlington national cemetery. we are on the steps of the capitol. there's is a huge crowd that has gathered. the watch is almost over. van is about to play hail to the chief. the casket will be brought down. the family is looking into the rotunda. a very quiet crowd. they are paying their last respects now. -- thed morning air cason will roll to arlington national cemetery. -- will notice in the crowd they are conscious that there is a television camera on them. you will see no waves. i saw one. there always tends to be just one. this day of mourning is reaching it's final act. feeling.only one just one. shared by all of us. let's go back to the studio. that from jack on the steps of the capitol. thing,n incredible beginning with the tragedy and the assassination. that seems aftermath like a mad unraveling. in chicago, a man turned to his wife a
the bible tells us. >> a day of remembrance, looking back at the life and leggy of president john f. kennedy. >>> and the death toll rises as a roof collapses on a supermarket in latvia. >>> and big news coming out the airline industry. it could effect your right to a quiet flight. ♪ >>> today the nation pauses to remember one of its darkest days in history. 50 years ago today president john f. kennedy was assassinated. a half a century later, people still mourn his death. this is where jfk is buried. and dallas is going to be holder a memorial dealey plaza. heidi zhou castro is there. >> dell, actually 14,000 people applied to be here today in audience is. of those only 5,000 won the ticket through a random lottery, and as you can see from the crowd, this rain and this bad weather is not keeping people at home. the flags are already at half staff for the nation's 35th president, who's death many americans still see as a mystery. a recent gallup poll found that 63% of americans do not believe that lee harvey oswald acted alone. before lee harvey oswald could be tried, he was killed on liv
with wings of eagle and run and not be weary. finally, in his last hours, president kennedy had prepared these words for dallas and for the nation, the rich -- righteous of our clause must always underlie our strength. for as was written long ago, accept the lord, guard the city, the guard watches in vain. the following is one of his favorite passages from scripture from the book of aclose -- the third chapter. there's an appointed time for everything, and a time for every affair under the heaives. d "issue" heavens. a time to be born, and a time to die, a time to plant and a time to uproot the plant. a time to kill, and a time to heal. a time to tear down and a time to build. a time to eat and a time to laugh. a time to mourn and a time to dance. a time to scatter stones and a time to gather them. a time to embrace and a time to be far from embraces. a time to seek and a time to lose. a time to keep and a time to cast away. a time to rend and a time to sow. a time to be silent and a time to speak. a time to love and a time to hate. a time of war and a time of peace. and now as the final
this a day of her membranes for john f. kennedy. the flag at the u.s. capitol is half-staff. a tribute to our president who died in dallas a half-century ago. this is the scene at arlington national cemetery. the final resting place for president kennedy and members of his family. we are focusing on both of these stories. we want to begin on the issue of the nuclear option. the senate action -- we want to hear from you. the numbers are on your screen. join us on facebook, send us an e-mail come a or send us a tweet. let's take a look at some of the headlines from the l.a. times. here in washington is the front page. the senate curbs the filibuster. that is the story above the fold. there is this from the dallas morning news. his courage still inspires us. the kids of 1963. this is available online at their website. story might imagine, the in the u.s. senate -- it eliminates filibusters on most nominees. here are the details. dramatic step the of eliminating filibusters for most nominations by presidents. they say this was necessary to fix a broken system. republicans say it will rupture it f
very much. >> top down is the name of the book and novel of the kennedy assassination joining us on a tv is author jim lehrer. and novel about the kennedy assassination. >> that's right. it's based on an experience i had on november 22, 1963. i was a reporter with the afternoon newspaper in dallas that i had an experience on that day has to do everybody else who was involved not elena coverage but just involved with that day. he kind of stuck in my head in my craw for 50 years. i used it as a seed for a novel which is about the bubble top over whether it was or was not at any given time on the presidential limousine that day and what consequences that might have had and the secret service agent who was overcome by guilt ,-com,-com ma fictional secret service agent overcome by guilt over what happened that day. >> are you featured in the book as a reporter? >> some people have suggested that. and narrator is a reporter and i was a dallas newspaper reported. on that day he didn't do exactly what i do with some modifications but after that its strict lee fiction. sure it's based on
. kennedy. in commemorating such a one whose life and presidency were to sow , we do so not in tears, as the psalmist says, but rather to reap with shouts of joy. help us, lord god, to make the late president's inaugural visit our own, so that together, as fellow americans, we may ask not what our country can do for us, but rather, what we can do for our country. and so, sacrificing ourselves for the sake of others helps -- help us go forth to lead the land we love, asking your blessing and your help in knowing that here on earth, your work, o god, must truly be our own. n your name we pray, amen. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to section 2a of house resolution 420, the journal of the last day's proceedings is approve the chair will lead the house in the pledge of allegiance. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the chair lays before the house a communication. the clerk: the honorable the speaker, house of representatives, sir, pursuant to the p
. kennedy was hardly passed his first 1000 days in office when he was fatally shot as his motorcade passed through dallas, texas. his death is marked by still unanswered questions. we'll look back at kennedy's life and legacy with our next guest -- acclaimed film director oliver stone. his 1991 political thriller eventsxamined the leading to kennedy's assassination and the alleged subsequent cover-up through the eyes of former new orleans district attorney jim garrison played by kevin costner. this is the film's trailer. >> shocking assassination of a president. >> john f. kennedy's murder was probably one of the most terrible moments in history of our country. >> the outrageous murder of a suspect. >> oswald has been shot. quick succession of the district attorney. the president. >> do i have to spell it out for you? >> who will risk everything. but i think you care more about john kennedy then your own family. >> why was kennedy killed? who benefited? who killed jfk? >> people got to know. au have to start things in different level like the cia does. people got to know why he was killed.
anniversary of the award, which was brought to the nation by president john f. kennedy 50 years ago. here with me eleanor, let's start with you, the clintons and obamas, this is a big day historically. after doing this ceremony, participating in the ceremony, the 50th anniversary of the medal of freedom, they are going to going to john f. kennedy's gravesite to pay homage to a president who forever be young and popular. i think it's fair to say this is a low point for president obama. president clinton had some low points of his own. he's now got extraordinary popularity. he's a democratic icon. republicans even like him. he's provided a life raft to the this president in the past. they need each other. there's a third person that will be joining them at the gravesite, hillary clinton. >> of course. >> i can't think of a parallel in history where you have a sitting president, a former president and a potential next president and so bill clinton's legacy is involved here. obama's success, how hillary clinton terms her campaign if she runs. i did a lot of interviewing on in this week and on
pronounced john f. kennedy dead. it would be another half hour before acting white house press secretary made the official announcement of the president's passing. and it would be at 2:50 eastern time when lee harvey oswald was arrested at the texas theater after a struggle. 50 years later the tragic events were called in a ceremony just concluding in dealey plaza. the president was shot as his motorcade passed. the mayor mike rollins spoke. >> we all grew up that day, city and citizens and suddenly we had to step up to trying to live up to the challenges of the words, and visions of a beloved president. >> after the mayor spoke those in the crowd bowed their head for a moment of silence. nbc's janet shamlian is live in dallas right now. janet, this is the first time that texas, dallas, has held a ceremony of this magnitude. we'll talk much more about it. but it is striking 50 years later to see these people there on a chilly day marking this moment. >> reporter: you're right about the weather too. the mood was reflective of what we're seeing here, 35 degrees, it feels more like duluth, minne
john f. kennedy's assassination. the images are etched in our collective memories. the president and the first lady in the open top limousine. the motorcade making its way toward dealey plaza. no signs of the tragedy about to unfold. today, the crowd gathered in dealey plaza. it will pause for a moment of silence at 12:30 p.m..local time, that's 1:30 p.m. eastern the moment the shots rang out. we're going to have live coverage of the ceremony. earlier today, members of the kennedy family held a wrea wreath-laying ceremony in arlington national cemetery. leading an the family, jean kennedy smith, jfk's last surviving sibling. we have a team of correspondences, authors, commentators here with us throughout this hour. they'll share their reflections on the assassination and the anniversary as well as the legacy of president kennedy. we want to start with the investigative reporter gerald posner, the historian david kaiser, both in watertown, massachusetts right now. correspondence ed lavandera is standing by as is our own john king. give us a quick thought, gerald. let's start with
neil was reporting from the scene and he was riding in the motorcade. mrs. kennedy was not injured, she was sitting between the president and governor connolly. a white man was seen in the window of a building about a block way from the cars. there are other reports that a man was seen with a high-powered rifle. there's no indication yet that whoever fired the shots a it the president and the texas governor has been found. >> driving along. the only people in the area. the shots came directly across the street from us. just as they became directly even with us, we took one look at him and he was sitting there, he and jackie were looking at a dog in the middle of the seat. and then at that time, two shots rang out just as he looked up. just as the president looked up. he saw shots. grabbed his chest. looked like he was in pain. he fell over in his seat. jackie fell over on him. he said, my god, he's been shot. >> where did the shots come from? >> just from the hill. just east of the underpass. >> uh-huh. >> on the south side. >> did you look up where the shots came from, ma'am? >> yes, sir. >> did y
and what other changes in history do we think would have happened had kennedy lived his full term are full to terms? >> i defer tax mr. k-9. >> i will try to answer that because it is all speculation. i do not think that mr. kennedy, even though he had done some things that were really exciting in the country, i don't think he would have had the power to get the legislation through the lyndon baines johnson did have been used to do that. how that might have affected the nation, it would have had another ten years without the civil rights legislation. i'm not sure what kind of chaos could have happened. >> is a very good answer. the bin many books written by nestorians there were qualified to address that issue. one that i recently had been reading. emphasizing the state to is the president and his brother for her my work in the justice apartment were extremely unhappy with the way in which the military officials of the country were demanding that they faugh -- they were seriously disturbed with the way in which the cia was handling the intelligence function. so there is some thought that t
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